Things to Know About Vitamin U

vitamin u

When you say vitamins A, B, C, D, E and K, do you also mean vitamin U? What is the difference between this vitamin and the ones we know? Does this vitamin also circulate in our blood? Where did it come from, now we hear you say! 🙂 So let me tell you right away! In fact, vitamin U is not a real vitamin! Let's examine the answers to all your questions together...

What is Vitamin U, What Is It For?

The medical world has different views about this vitamin, which was discovered by isolating it from cabbage juice in the 1950s. In fact, it is not a real vitamin as a form. One of the derivatives of the amino acid methionine is "S-methylmethionine".

If you are wondering why it got the name U, it is because it takes the initial letter of 'ULSER' disease. Because this vitamin stomach ailments It is in the content of some foods that are good.

What Is Vitamin U Found in?

Red and white cabbage contain plenty of vitamin U. Apart from that, broccoli and brussels sprouts are foods that contain high levels of vitamin U.

According to studies, the leaves of the 'Graviola' plant, a traditional plant grown in tropical countries, also contain large amounts of vitamin U. But its bioavailability is not good enough. Since vitamin U is a very new component, it seems to be found in some foods yet, but in fact, food diversity may increase as it is researched and over time. However, it seems that the scientific world needs a little more research on the subject.

vitamin u

What Are the Benefits of Vitamin U?

Its best known benefit is on stomach ulcers. Apart from stomach problems such as colitis and gastritis, it also has the effect of regulating the digestive system and strengthening the immune system. Today, experts recommend especially those who have gastritis problems to relax their stomach by consuming cabbage. For this reason, if you ask what is cabbage good for, the first answer we will give will be stomach problems.

The benefits of vitamin U with its lowering effect on cholesterol and blood triglyceride levels have been proven by some studies. As a result of an 8-week study, subjects given 1,5 grams of vitamin U had a 10% decrease in HDL and total cholesterol levels. It was observed.

Another benefit of vitamin U is faster healing of wounds in the body. As a result of some studies on animals, it has been determined that vitamin U also gives positive results on sunburns. For this reason, cosmetic manufacturers plan to produce creams containing vitamin U.

Vitamin U can also be good for tinnitus problems. For the treatment of tinnitus, experts recommend the consumption of foods containing plenty of vitamin U, apart from psychological support.

Side Effects of Vitamin U

If you want to take vitamin U into your body, it will be healthier to take it directly with food. As a supplement; There is no vitamin U in drop and tablet form. There is not much information about the harms of vitamin U yet!

According to the European Chemicals Agency (Europan Chemicals Agency, ECHA); Direct contact of this vitamin with eyes and skin may cause irritation. For this reason, it should be used consciously by paying great attention to the amount in skin care products.

Things to pay attention

Consumption of cabbage, broccoli and brussels sprouts is considered safe during pregnancy and lactation.

If you want to get enough of this vitamin into your body through food, there are some points you need to pay attention to. What are these? Cabbage to be consumed must be grown in the field in a controlled manner. You should especially focus on the white, yellowish or greenish ones. Cabbage, which is large and white, is the type with the highest known vitamin U content. Therefore, you can easily choose this type.

As a result; It is beneficial to always take the nutrients your body needs naturally. In this way, it will not be very difficult to establish the body balance. If you have a vitamin and mineral deficiency, you should use supplements under the control of a specialist. Otherwise, you may witness more harm than good. That's why we say be careful! Stay healthy…

Senior Food Engineer

Merve Karatasli

Last updated April 23, 2021